I swear by Castle X, Typhoon Helmets, FXR, and Carhartt when it comes to the best snowmobile gloves. Mittens like Black Diamond and Outdoor Research also give excellent protection against the harsh conditions of the snowy weather. Every winter, I take my snowmobile on a snowy slope and these gloves never fail me.

I personally prefer Castle X because of its thick, rugged, and strong construction that can endure subzero temperatures. Sometimes, I alternate it with Typhoon Helmets, FXR, and Carhartt that are both made with excellent grip and insulation. The likes of Black Diamond and Outdoor Research mittens are also great options if finger dexterity isn’t an issue.

 

Best Pick
Castle X Epic Snowmobile Gloves
Best Leather Gloves
Typhoon Helmets Leather Snowmobile Gloves
Best Heated Gloves
FXR Heated Snowmobile Gloves
Best Budget Choice
Carhartt Insulated Gloves
Best Mittens
Black Diamond Mittens
Best Women's Mittens
Outdoor Research Women’s Rugged Mitts
Castle X Epic-G1 Mens Snowmobile Gloves - Gray- LRG
Premium Leather Snowmobile Gloves Gauntlet Ski Cold Weather (L Large)
FXR Mens Heated Recon Glove 2020 (Black - Large)
Carhartt Men's WP Waterproof Insulated Glove, Black, Medium
Black Diamond Mercury Mitts Cold Weather Mittens, Black, X-Small
Outdoor Research Women's Alti Mitts
Pre-curved fingers
Made of genuine leather
Hipora windproof liner
Made with a polytex shell
Authentic goat skin on the palm area
Kevlar stitching for added durability
Very thick 3M Thinsulate
Soft 3M Thinsulate insulation
Full-grain leather palm
Polyurethane palm for better grip
340 grams of Prim fleece
Made of Goretex fleece
Windproof design
Windproof and snow-proof design
Three stages of thermal heat
Fast Dry technology lining
Dry insert for better moisture-wicking
Pocket for heat packs
-
-
-
$59.99
$49.95
$259.99
$26.99
$82.99
Price not available
Best Pick
Castle X Epic Snowmobile Gloves
Castle X Epic-G1 Mens Snowmobile Gloves - Gray- LRG
Pre-curved fingers
Very thick 3M Thinsulate
Windproof design
$59.99
Best Leather Gloves
Typhoon Helmets Leather Snowmobile Gloves
Premium Leather Snowmobile Gloves Gauntlet Ski Cold Weather (L Large)
Made of genuine leather
Soft 3M Thinsulate insulation
Windproof and snow-proof design
-
$49.95
Best Heated Gloves
FXR Heated Snowmobile Gloves
FXR Mens Heated Recon Glove 2020 (Black - Large)
Hipora windproof liner
Full-grain leather palm
Three stages of thermal heat
-
$259.99
Best Budget Choice
Carhartt Insulated Gloves
Carhartt Men's WP Waterproof Insulated Glove, Black, Medium
Made with a polytex shell
Polyurethane palm for better grip
Fast Dry technology lining
$26.99
Best Mittens
Black Diamond Mittens
Black Diamond Mercury Mitts Cold Weather Mittens, Black, X-Small
Authentic goat skin on the palm area
340 grams of Prim fleece
Dry insert for better moisture-wicking
$82.99
Best Women's Mittens
Outdoor Research Women’s Rugged Mitts
Outdoor Research Women's Alti Mitts
Kevlar stitching for added durability
Made of Goretex fleece
Pocket for heat packs
-
Price not available

1. Castle X Epic Snowmobile Gloves

 

Castle X Epic-G1 Mens Snowmobile Gloves - Gray- LRG

When it comes to the warmest snowmobile gloves, I recommend the Castle X. This pair is a powerhouse of insulation, strong construction, and hand dexterity. I always keep it handy every winter whenever I’m riding on freezing temperatures. It’s a pair of gloves that every rider, snowmobile or not, should have.

But before I pepper Castle X with praises, let me discuss some downsides. First of all, it runs small for those with above-average hands like my brother. Also, it struggles a bit whenever the temperature goes below freezing. If your jacket has tightly cinched cuffs, it would be difficult to tuck the cuffs in. Other than that, I don’t have major gripes for this pair of snowmobile gloves.

The good thing about Castle X gloves is that it didn’t skimp on insulation. It boasts a 3M Platinum Thinsulate that’s 200 grams at the back of the hand and 150 grams at the palm area. The palms of the snowmobile gloves are also reinforced with a secure-grip layer. For added safety, there are 3M Scotchlite reflective strips all over the fingers and the back of the hand. These snowmobiling gloves also have a non-abrasive soft-touch thumb panel perfect for skiing and snowmobiling.

Castle X Epic-G1 Mens Snowmobile Gloves - Gray- LRG

Another thing that I like about the Castle X Epic gloves is its pre-curved fingers. It’s a small feature yet very valuable for snowmobile riders like me. It’s easier to grip handlebars with this design and palm material. What I also like is the Hipora windproof membrane paired with a DWR-coated shell that keeps the chilly wind out of my hands even at 100 mph. I also have to highlight the shock cord on the weather-blocking gauntlet that keeps snow from entering these best rated snowmobile gloves.

Overall, I’m impressed with Castle X Epic Gloves. Its thick insulation, pre-curved fingers, extended cuffs, and the waterproof feature is everything I’d wish for the best gloves for snowmobiling. It’s also affordable, considering the quality of materials used and the durability of the construction. So if you’re looking for a pair of snowmobile gloves for the upcoming winter, you’ll never go wrong with Castle X.

Pros
  • Pre-curved fingers
  • Very thick 3M Thinsulate
  • Windproof design
  • Reflective strips for added safety
  • Excellent sure-grip material
  • Soft-touch thumb panel
Cons
  • It’s a bit difficult to tuck the cuffs to a tight jacket

 

 

2. Typhoon Helmets Leather Snowmobile Gloves

 

Premium Leather Snowmobile Gloves Gauntlet Ski Cold Weather (L Large)

Typhoon Helmets is another favorite gloves of mine whenever I have to ride my snowmobile. These leather snowmobile gloves offer windproof, durable, and well-insulated features. It has a rugged construction that can endure regular wear and tear. In fact, I have these gloves for two years now and still look good-as-new after frequent wearing.

But looking at the downsides of these gloves, I noticed that it’s a little stiff at first. I had to break it in for a few days before it became comfortable to use on snowmobile handlebars. If you wear this straight from the package, it will be difficult to work on the clutch and brake levers, which can be very dangerous. Another thing that I didn’t like about these gloves is the lower dexterity level. Anyway, this is understandable since leather is naturally stiffer than fabric.

On the upside, these gloves offer a ton of benefits. It’s made of genuine leather that really takes the beating of harsh weather and sharp objects. The sweet spot of these gloves is the 3M Thinsulate that remains soft and lightweight. It also has a long cuff design with a cinch at the wrist area and a large Velcro enclosure at the seams. I like the adjustable feature, too, which is a big plus considering that this is made of leather.

In addition, I also like the rugged patches at the back of the fingers that serve as reinforcements. It’s a great addition to sports snowmobile riders and high-speed rides. These gloves keep sleet, snow, rain, and wind out of your hands. Another advantage here is that the gloves are available in a wide range of sizes, from extra small to 2XL. And if you’re not happy with these cold-weather snowmobile gloves, you can send it back for a refund. The shipping charges deducted from the refunded price.

In conclusion, the Typhoon Helmets is a stylish and durable option if you’re looking for the best snowmobile gloves for trail riding. Although I had to break it in first, it’s just a small sacrifice for the quality and construction of these winter gloves. For its price, I’m already a winner.

Pros
  • Made of genuine leather
  • Soft 3M Thinsulate insulation
  • Windproof and snow-proof design
  • Available in a wide range of sizes
  • Ideal for skiing, snowmobiling, and other winter sports
  • Rugged finger reinforcements
Cons
  • You have to break it in first

 

3. FXR Heated Snowmobile Gloves

 

FXR Mens Heated Recon Glove 2020 (Black - Large)

If you’re going to ask me what the best heated snowmobile gloves are, my answer will always be FXR Heated Recon Gloves. This is made with thick insulation paired with a heating element to beat the lowest temperatures you may encounter. I once brought these gloves in a subzero ride and I have no regrets. It’s always my go-to snowmobile gloves whenever our area is experiencing a blizzard.

But before I dig through the good points, I just want to lay some downsides here. Due to the addition of the heating elements, the FXR gloves are a little heavier. If you’re used to thin and lightweight gloves, the FXR may seem cumbersome for you. Next, I had to get a second set of batteries that can hold more power, especially for long snowmobile rides. And since the heating element is on the gloves’ cuffs, it’s almost impossible to tuck it on the seams of my jacket.

Nevertheless, FXR gloves remain as the warmest snowmobile gloves. It boasts three stages of thermal heat settings on the gauntlet exterior with an easy-press button. The heating feature covers the back of the hand as well as individual finger slots. Each charge gives me about 3 to 4 hours of heating. If you want to enjoy a longer burn time with these gloves, I suggest that you get a high-powered battery replacement. The glove package includes a wall charger so loading up the battery would be hassle-free.

FXR Mens Heated Recon Glove 2020 (Black - Large)

Another thing that I like about these snowmobile gloves is the full-grain leather palm layer that gives an unbeatable grip. Based on my experience, this grip can hold up even on wet conditions, so it’s a big plus. This is paired with a waterproof Hipora liner to keep my hands dry even if the snow gets into the exterior shell. I also like the adjustable storm cuff that makes these men’s snowmobile gloves weather-proof.  For added safety, it also has 3M Scotchlite reflective strips.

With all these features, the FXR Heated Recon Gloves make a great choice, even for subzero conditions. It’s made of premium materials with pre-curved fingers that help in gripping the snowmobile handlebars.  I like its dexterity and powerful heating features, a combination that’s quite a rarity for many winter gloves.

Pros
  • Integrated heating element
  • Hipora windproof liner
  • 3M Scotchlite reflective strips
  • Full-grain leather palm
  • Easy-press button on the gauntlet area
  • Three stages of thermal heat
Cons
  • The cuffs feels a little bulky

 

 

4. Carhartt Insulated Gloves

 

Carhartt Men's W.p. Waterproof Insulated Work Glove, Black, Medium

If you’re on a budget, what I recommend is the Carhartt Insulated Gloves. This has a reinforced shell that can stand outdoor temperatures even when I’m on a snowmobile. It’s a humble pair of gloves that offer decent features even for a lower price. What I also like about these gloves is its chic and stylish look since it’s also available in four different color combinations.

However, I have to mention some minor niggles about these snowmobile gloves. For those with larger hands, it feels like a tight squeeze whenever you will make a fist with the gloves on. Also, I noticed that the cuffs are cinched too much that I find it hard to put the gloves on and off quickly. Another thing that you should also know is that these snowmobile gloves are not the best pair for subzero temperatures. I usually reserve these gloves for higher temperatures that are not below freezing.

Despite the mentioned downsides, I still believe that Carhartt is the best snowmobile gloves for cold fingers. It’s made of durable and pure polyester with a polytex shell. I also like the polyurethane palm that acts as a reinforcement for gripping the handlebars of a snowmobile. There’s also a waterproof insert in these gloves that keeps my hands dry for mildly wet conditions. Since I sweat easily, I appreciate the addition of the FastDry technology lining that wicks away the moisture really well.

Moreover, these waterproof snowmobile gloves have stick grip fingers and a digital grip palm that makes it easy for me to hold handlebars. I also like the stretch fleece cuffs that are comfortable to touch and easy to tuck under my jacket. These gloves also boast an excellent dexterity that I can also use for garden and handyman work, aside from riding snowmobiles. Its rugged construction makes it enduring with outdoor elements as well as regular use.

If you’re looking for snowmobile and snow machine gloves, this Carhartt pair will not disappoint. It’s made of premium material with a good fit for those with average hands. Although it’s not the best option for subzero conditions, it still has a place for my winter toolkit. For a low price, these gloves are already a steal.

Pros
  • Made with a polytex shell
  • Polyurethane palm for better grip
  • Stretch fleece cuffs
  • Fast Dry technology lining
  • Made of 100% polyester
  • Durable buckles
Cons
  • I wish the cuffs are less tight

 

5. Black Diamond Mittens

 

Black Diamond Mercury Mitts Cold Weather Mittens, Black, X-Small

One advantage of wearing mittens is that the fingers are rubbing together, thus more warmth. This is the reason why I always keep a pair of Black Diamond snowmobile mittens. It’s made with thick and rugged material that shields my hands from cold temperatures. Surprisingly, it has a good grip, which helps a lot whenever I’m driving a snowmobile around.

Still, the Black Diamond gloves have some downsides, too. I noticed that it fits really small, especially for chubby hands. I recommend getting a size up if your hand size is bigger than average. The furry lining also feels too tight around the thumb, which feels a little awkward whenever I have to grip the snowmobile handlebars. It took several uses before it loosened up and become more comfortable. My only issue now is that the liner isn’t as sweat-wicking as I expect it to be.

On the positive side of these gloves, I like the fact that its outer shell is made of 92% nylon and 8% spandex. It has the right stretch and a water-resistant layer. Meanwhile, the lining of these gloves made of pure polyester with a palm area made of authentic goat skin. I must say, the goat skin layer really adds a nice grip and a waterproof feature on the palms. There’s also a dry insert to boost the waterproofing of these snowmobiling mittens.

Another thing that I love about Black Diamond is its Pretext Shield shell. It’s a 4-way stretch material that’s abrasion-resistant and lightweight at the same time. There’s also a removable liner packed with 340 grams of Prim aloft and high-loft fleece. So if you’re looking for the best snowmobile gloves for mounting riding on winter, this pair will not disappoint. Lastly, I like the adjustable wrist cinch equipped with a plastic buckle and a nylon strap.

The Black Diamond mittens offer topnotch insulation for snowmobiling, skiing, and other winter activities. It may not have individual fingers, but I’m quite satisfied by the hand dexterity even when driving a snowmobile. If you’re looking for a rugged pair of mittens/gloves, I highly recommend that you try this one.

Pros
  • Authentic goat skin on the palm area
  • 340 grams of Prim fleece
  • Dry insert for better moisture-wicking
  • Removable liner
  • Adjustable wrist cinch
  • Decent hand dexterity
Cons
  • The furry lining could be looser

 

 

6. Outdoor Research Women’s Rugged Mitts

 

Outdoor Research Men's Waterproof Breathable Rugged GORE-TEX Alti Mitts

Are you looking for Goretex snowmobile gloves? If so, I recommend that you check the Outdoor Research Rugged Mitts. Since it’s made of Goretex fleece, it offers excellent insulation, waterproofing, and comfort for users. For the ladies who are looking for the perfect pair of subzero mittens, this would be a great choice.

But just like any mitts, Outdoor Research bears some downsides. I want to warn about its dexterity because it’s something you’ll have to trade for excellent warmth. If you’re thinking of skiing or doing other precise tasks that’s not snowmobiling, these mittens might be challenging to wear. It’s difficult to grab things with this one and it tends to slip out if you have a slim wrist. Some users also complain about the mittens/gloves being too baggy.

Overall, those are just minor issues that I can live with. The Outdoor Research Rugged Mitts is made with Goretex fleece, a material known for its excellent waterproof features while retaining its breathability. These gloves also offer extreme winter protection, which is the perfect choice for people like me who gets their hands chilly really fast. These snowmobile gloves have Kevlar stitching for guaranteed durability on its three-panel thumb.

Another thing that I like about these snowmobile gloves is its leather palms with fully taped seams. It also has a pre-curved construction so it’s easy for me to grip the handlebars. Aside from that, these gloves sport a removable liner with AlpenGrip tabs so it’s easy to put on and off. To top these features is a SuperCinch gauntlet that allows me to keep the Goretex snowmobile gloves snug on my hands.  There’s also a pocket where I can stash heat packs to boost the warmth of these gloves/mittens.

In conclusion, the Outdoor Research gloves are a great choice for those who are looking for the right balance of warmth, durability, and comfort. I always have this pair on my closet and it comes handy for short snowmobile rides and even shoveling snow out of my front lawn. Sure, it costs more than other options, but every dollar is worth the splurge considering the quality of these best mitts.

Pros
  • Kevlar stitching for added durability
  • Made of Goretex fleece
  • AlpenGrip tabs
  • Leather palms for better grip
  • Fully taped seams
  • Pocket for heat packs
Cons
  • The dexterity is a trade-off for better insulation

 

 

Buying Guide for the Best Snowmobile Gloves

Snowmobile gloves should protect from the cold temperature while giving you a nice grip. I recommend that you consider the following points before putting your money on a new pair:

Mittens vs. gloves

The first thing you have to think about is whether you need a pair of gloves or mittens. Both are functional but in different ways.

Mittens are ideal for extremely cold weather. Since your fingers are joined together, there would be more warmth. Also, the large finger pocket offers thicker padding and insulation. Mittens are also windproof for speedy snowmobile rides.

However, the downside to mittens is the reduced hand dexterity. If your snowmobiles have buttons and small controls, it would be challenging to work on it using a pair of mittens.

On the other hand, the best snowmobile gloves for extreme cold have their perks too. Since gloves have individual fingers, it offers better hand dexterity. Depending on the materials used and insulation thickness, gloves can perform under subzero conditions.

If there’s a downside to snowmobile gloves, it would be the reduced padding since the fingers are separated. Making the padding thick with each finger will make it chunky and uncomfortable when driving a snowmobile.

Size matters

Whatever snowmobile gloves you’re buying, proper sizing is paramount. A well-insulated pair of gloves has no use if it doesn’t fit you well.

When choosing snowmobile gloves, ensure that it remains comfortable even when you’re making a fist. The pre-curved glove fingers are also ideal since it’s shaped on the handlebars right away.

Always measure your hands against the sizing chart of the snowmobile glove brand. For those with larger than normal hands, it’s best to avoid one-size-fits-all gloves.

Check the material

Snowmobile gloves can come in different materials. The following are the most common options:

Polyester. Polyester is durable and cheap. It’s also soft, but only moisture-wicking to some extent. It’s usually paired with other materials for glove reinforcements.

Leather. Leather gloves are a perfect choice if you want a waterproof pair. However, a purely leather glove is stiffer than fabric. You may also need to break the gloves in for a few days for it to be comfortable as snowmobile gloves. Some fabric gloves have leather palms for better durability.

Gore-Tex. Gore-Tex is a waterproof fabric that’s breathable at the same time. It repels liquids and remains durable even after consistent wear and tear. Basically, it stops rain from entering the gloves while letting sweat out.

Get a proper liner

Liners are the material inserts on the gloves. It makes snowmobile gloves more comfortable and warm. The liner also wicks moisture if ever your hands get sweaty.

Most winter gloves use fleece as lining because it’s soft and absorbent. What’s important is that the liner doesn’t just serve as padding but also adds insulation. Most snowmobile gloves have liners, which are made of different materials.

You can also find removable liners, which is ideal since you can wash it separately since snowmobile gloves take time to dry. Some glove brands also offer replacement liners that you can purchase separately.

Insulation matters

When it comes to snowmobile gloves, insulation is king. The gloves should keep your hands safe from the harsh and subzero temperatures of winter. Snowmobiling gloves should be insulated against low temperatures, snow, and moisture.

The best insulation material for snowmobile gloves is 3M Thinsulate. It’s a synthetic thermal fiber which is light but tough as insulation. It’s believed to be thrice as warm as other insulation materials.

You can also find fleece insulation, but this type usually can’t stand subzero temperatures.

If you want the best warmth, you can opt for a heated pair of snowmobile gloves. These gloves have an integrated heating element powered by a rechargeable battery. Most heated gloves can offer up to 4 hours of warmth per charge.

Lastly, consider snowmobile gloves with a pocket where you can place heat pads for immediate warmth.

Opt for waterproof and windproof features

Aside from the temperatures, you should also consider the wind factor when looking for snowmobile gloves. Most snowmobiles have an average speed of 90 to 100 mph. If your wrists are exposed, it will only take a few minutes for your hands to freeze on a subzero temperature.

This is why I always recommend gauntlet gloves for snowmobiling. The extended length lets you tuck the cuffs into your jacket.

Aside from that, always put your money on waterproof snowmobile gloves. This will keep the moisture out of your hands, especially on rainy winters. Despite that, the gloves should wick sweat from the inside.

Consider the dexterity

Driving a snowmobile is a serious business, especially at high speeds. You have to hold the handlebars firmly and work on several buttons and switches. With this, the gloves should have excellent dexterity without sacrificing warmth.

The rule of thumb is that you should still feel comfortable to make a fist with the gloves on. If you have to tinker on small buttons, avoid stiff materials.

Nothing beats a good grip

The grip is the child of dexterity. When driving a snowmobile, you need gloves with a good grip even on wet conditions. This is a matter of safety and efficiency.

Snowmobiles often have rubber handles. For the best grip, try getting a pair of gloves with a grippy leather material or textured rubber. Full-grain and authentic leather is the best since it has a natural ‘stickiness’ that gets better over time.

Adjustability is important

The biggest challenge in purchasing snowmobile gloves is finding the right fit. This wouldn’t be a big issue if the model you’re planning to buy has an adjustable wrist.

Most snowmobile gloves have cinched wrists or drawstring gauntlets. You can also opt for a type with a Velcro strap that you can adjust on the fly.

Final words

The best snowmobile gloves should have the best grip, topnotch insulation, and unbeatable comfort. This is the reason why Castle X, Typhoon Helmets, FXR, and Carhartt are leaders in winter gloves. Black Diamond and Outdoor Research mittens also have features to boast.

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